Employment

  • July 18, 2024

    Insults Fly As Attys Beef Over Ex-NFL Player's Sex Abuse Suit

    Attorneys for an ex-NFL player and the former controller for his reptile shipping company accused each other of stonewalling, dishonesty and running up litigation costs at a hearing Thursday, where a Colorado state judge largely ignored the lawyers' "speeches" and urged them to confer more meaningfully.

  • July 18, 2024

    Florida Urges 11th Circ. To Allow Gender Law Despite Appeal

    Florida officials have urged the Eleventh Circuit to immediately allow enforcement of a law restricting gender-affirming treatment for transgender minors and adults despite an appeal, saying a lower court wrongly determined the law was discriminatory and that patients will be harmed if "life-altering" medical procedures are not outlawed.

  • July 18, 2024

    5th Circ. Upholds Tossing Of Ship Captain's Toxic Injury Suit

    A former offshore supply vessel captain, who claims chemicals aboard caused his cancer and kidney failure, must sue his U.S. employer in England, the Fifth Circuit has ruled, saying the employment contract's forum selection clause is enforceable even after considering Louisiana's law which largely prohibits such clauses.

  • July 18, 2024

    9th Circ. Revives Fired Doctor's COVID Vax Religious Bias Suit

    The Ninth Circuit revived a doctor's claims that Washington State University failed to accommodate his religious beliefs when it fired him from his residency for refusing the COVID-19 vaccine, ruling Thursday that U.S. Supreme Court precedent necessitates another look at his case.

  • July 18, 2024

    Ex-Seattle Port Police Chief Seeks Up To $20M In Firing Trial

    The Port of Seattle's former police chief told a Washington state jury on Thursday that $14 million to $20 million from his former employer would be a "reasonable range" of damages for robbing him of his law enforcement career as punishment for complaining about unfairness in workplace misconduct investigations.

  • July 18, 2024

    SpaceX Tells 5th Circ. It Will Win Challenge To NLRB Structure

    The Fifth Circuit should block claims that SpaceX violated labor law from proceeding before the National Labor Relations Board because the company has a good shot at winning its constitutional challenge to the agency's structure, SpaceX argued.

  • July 18, 2024

    Miner Seeks Atty Fees After 4th Circ. DOL Judges Ruling

    A former miner urged the Fourth Circuit to approve approximately $21,000 in attorney fees in his case seeking benefits for his black lung disease, saying he has been unable to reach a settlement with an engineering company that challenged the appointment of two U.S. Department of Labor administrative law judges.

  • July 18, 2024

    Ga. County Escapes Jailer Discrimination Suit

    Troup County, Georgia, beat a retaliation and discrimination suit lodged by a former jail officer who had accused the county of allowing a chief deputy sheriff to allude to her being owned by someone in a slavery reference, according to a finding in federal court Wednesday.

  • July 18, 2024

    6th Circ. Is No Help To CSX Worker Fired For Train Death Post

    The Sixth Circuit ruled Thursday that a former CSX Transporation Inc. engineer waited too long to try to revive his wrongful termination suit stemming from his firing over an online post he made about a fatal train accident.  

  • July 18, 2024

    Moody's Says White Ex-Director's Depo 'Fatal' To Bias Suit

    Financial analytics company Moody's on Wednesday told a Pennsylvania federal judge that it was clear a former employee who sued it for discrimination wasn't fired for being white and old, pointing to his "fatal" admission that he'd still be employed had he responded to a company vaccination survey.

  • July 18, 2024

    CEO Firing Case Tied To Mogul Going To Mediation

    A former chief executive and a European IT company tied to convicted mogul Greg Lindberg will head to mediation as part of a back-and-forth case involving allegations of firing without warning and spending company money on women's lingerie.

  • July 18, 2024

    Feds Say Loper Bright Not Relevant In IVF Policy Suit

    The U.S. Department of Defense urged a New York federal court Thursday to throw out a nonprofit's lawsuit challenging its in vitro fertilization coverage policy for service members, countering the group's argument that the agency can't shake the suit because the U.S. Supreme Court upended Chevron deference.

  • July 18, 2024

    FordHarrison Accused Of 'Terrorizing' Conn. Library Workers

    Multistate employment law firm FordHarrison LLP has been dragged into existing feuds between a Connecticut library and two of its employees, with new state court lawsuits accusing the firm of misrepresenting state law and inflicting emotional distress by demanding the employees retract claims allegedly made at a public hearing.

  • July 18, 2024

    Texas Can't Nix EEOC Guidance Over Gender Identity

    A Texas federal judge refused to grant the state attorney general's request to do away with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's enforcement guidance over gender identity, saying the state needs to file a new lawsuit and not piggyback on a case that was closed two years ago.

  • July 18, 2024

    Healthcare Co. Says Fired In-House Atty Lacks Standing To Sue

    Kidney care company Panoramic Health has urged a Colorado federal judge to toss a former assistant general counsel's lawsuit that claims she was fired for raising concerns about violations of federal anti-kickback statutes.

  • July 18, 2024

    NJ Gov., Ex-Elections Chief Spar Over Push To Resign

    Garden State Gov. Phil Murphy told a New Jersey state judge Thursday claims from the former elections chief that his civil rights were violated when he was pushed to resign allegedly in retaliation for a satirical article should be tossed, arguing there is nothing in the law that prevents him from asking a state official to resign.

  • July 18, 2024

    Police Dept. Beats Cop's Suit Over Political Rally Attendance

    A California police department defeated an officer's lawsuit alleging he was unlawfully fired after attending a "Stop the Steal" rally in early 2021, with a federal judge finding he was fired based on social media posts that violated department policies, not his political activities.

  • July 18, 2024

    Feds Say UAW Shouldn't Be Able To Keep Info From Monitor

    Allowing the United Auto Workers to withhold information from the court-appointed monitor overseeing its cleanup from days of corruption and embezzlement would undermine the purpose of the monitorship, the federal government and the monitor told a Michigan federal judge, asking him to deny the union's bid to shield documents.

  • July 18, 2024

    Au Pair Co. Can't Arbitrate Wage Claims, 1st Circ. Told

    A group of former au pairs who say they were underpaid for their work has urged the First Circuit to affirm that Cultural Care can't force them into arbitration in Switzerland, calling the agency's position a delay tactic with no merit.

  • July 18, 2024

    Urgent Care Nurses Snag Collective Cert. In Wage Suit

    Nurses claiming an urgent care chain owes them wages can move forward as a collective in their suit, an Illinois federal judge ruled, saying the worker who lodged the suit showed she was similarly situated as her colleagues.

  • July 18, 2024

    Warner Bros. Hit With PAGA Suit By Background Actor

    Warner Bros. has not been paying background actors all their wages owed by failing to incorporate incentive payments into overtime calculations and requiring them to work through breaks unpaid, according to a Private Attorneys General Act suit filed in California state court.

  • July 18, 2024

    X's NYC Office Settles Ex-Janitors' Back Pay Suit

    A group of unionized janitors who used to work in the New York City offices of social media company X have settled a suit alleging the company failed to comply with a city law requiring it to keep the janitors on for 90 days after terminating their contract.

  • July 18, 2024

    Property Co. Settles Ex-Manager's Race Bias Suit

    A Black former apartment complex manager who accused her ex-employer of putting her in charge of a struggling development because of her race and then firing her for complaining about the situation told a Pennsylvania federal court that her claims had been settled.

  • July 17, 2024

    SF Vax-Mandate Case Will Go To New Jury After Partial Verdict

    A California federal jury considering claims that the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District discriminated against employees who sought religious exemptions from the train agency's COVID-19 mandate rendered a partial verdict Wednesday but hung on a key question, leaving the case unresolved and setting the stage for another trial.

  • July 17, 2024

    'Good Try': EEOC Can't Stop Tesla Talking To Putative Class

    A California federal judge Wednesday rejected the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's bid to bar Tesla from speaking to all putative class members in its lawsuit alleging the carmaker allowed rampant racism to overtake a California factory, rejecting the request while telling its attorney, "Good try, though."

Expert Analysis

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: July Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy considers cases touching on pre- and post-conviction detainment conditions, communications with class representatives, when the American Pipe tolling doctrine stops applying to modified classes, and more.

  • Biden Policy Gives Employers New Ways To Help Dreamers

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    A new Biden administration immigration policy makes the process more predictable for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipients to seek employment visas, and, given uncertainties surrounding DACA’s future, employers should immediately determine which of their employees may be eligible, says Jennifer Kim at Moore & Van Allen.

  • How To Comply With Chicago's New Paid Leave Ordinance

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    Chicago's new Paid Leave and Paid Sick and Safe Leave Ordinance went into effect earlier this month, so employers subject to the new rules should update leave policies, train supervisors and deliver notice as they seek compliance, say Alison Crane and Sarah Gasperini at Jackson Lewis.

  • Opinion

    A Way Forward For The US Steel-Nippon Deal And Union Jobs

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    Parties involved in Nippon Steel's acquisition of U.S. Steel should trust the Pennsylvania federal court overseeing a key environmental settlement to supervise a way of including future union jobs and cleaner air for the city of Pittsburgh as part of a transparent business marriage, says retired judge Susan Braden.

  • How NJ Worker Status Ruling Benefits Real Estate Industry

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    In Kennedy v. Weichert, the New Jersey Supreme Court recently said a real estate agent’s employment contract would supersede the usual ABC test analysis to determine his classification as an independent contractor, preserving operational flexibility for the industry — and potentially others, say Jason Finkelstein and Dalila Haden at Cole Schotz.

  • Opinion

    H-2 Visas Offer Humane, Economic Solution To Border Crisis

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    Congress should leverage the H-2 agricultural and temporary worker visa programs to match qualified migrants with employers facing shortages of workers — a nonpolitical solution to a highly divisive humanitarian issue, say Ashley Dees and Jeffrey Joseph at BAL.

  • PAGA Reforms Encourage Proactive Employer Compliance

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    Recently enacted reforms to California's Private Attorneys General Act should make litigation under the law less burdensome for employers, presenting a valuable opportunity to streamline compliance and reduce litigation risks by proactively addressing many of the issues that have historically attracted PAGA claims, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • Opinion

    Now More Than Ever, Lawyers Must Exhibit Professionalism

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    As society becomes increasingly fractured and workplace incivility is on the rise, attorneys must champion professionalism and lead by example, demonstrating how lawyers can respectfully disagree without being disagreeable, says Edward Casmere at Norton Rose.

  • The Show Must Go On: Noncompete Uncertainty In Film, TV

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    The Federal Trade Commission has taken action to ban noncompetes while the entertainment industry is in the midst of a massive shift away from traditional media, so it is important for studio heads and content owners alike to understand the fate of the rule and their options going forward, say Christopher Chatham and Douglas Smith at Manatt.

  • 'Outsourcing' Ruling, 5 Years On: A Warning, Not A Watershed

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    A New York federal court’s 2019 ruling in U.S. v. Connolly, holding that the government improperly outsourced an investigation to Deutsche Bank, has not undercut corporate cooperation incentives as feared — but companies should not completely ignore the lessons of the case, say Temidayo Aganga-Williams and Anna Nabutovsky at Selendy Gay.

  • Series

    Serving In The National Guard Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My ongoing military experience as a judge advocate general in the National Guard has shaped me as a person and a lawyer, teaching me the importance of embracing confidence, balance and teamwork in both my Army and civilian roles, says Danielle Aymond at Baker Donelson.

  • Big Business May Come To Rue The Post-Administrative State

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    Many have framed the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decisions overturning Chevron deference and extending the window to challenge regulations as big wins for big business, but sand in the gears of agency rulemaking may be a double-edged sword, creating prolonged uncertainty that impedes businesses’ ability to plan for the future, says Todd Baker at Columbia University.

  • A Midyear Forecast: Tailwinds Expected For Atty Hourly Rates

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    Hourly rates for partners, associates and support staff continued to rise in the first half of this year, and this growth shows no signs of slowing for the rest of 2024 and into next year, driven in part by the return of mergers and acquisitions and the widespread adoption of artificial intelligence, says Chuck Chandler at Valeo Partners.

  • A Timeline Of Antisemitism Legislation And What It Means

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    What began as hearings in the House of Representatives Committee on Education and the Workforce has expanded to a House-wide effort to combat antisemitism and related issues, with wide-ranging implications for education, finance and nonprofit entities, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Opinion

    States Should Loosen Law Firm Ownership Restrictions

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    Despite growing buzz, normalized nonlawyer ownership of law firms is a distant prospect, so the legal community should focus first on liberalizing state restrictions on attorney and firm purchases of practices, which would bolster succession planning and improve access to justice, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

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