Transportation

  • July 18, 2024

    5th Circ. Upholds Tossing Of Ship Captain's Toxic Injury Suit

    A former offshore supply vessel captain, who claims chemicals aboard caused his cancer and kidney failure, must sue his U.S. employer in England, the Fifth Circuit has ruled, saying the employment contract's forum selection clause is enforceable even after considering Louisiana's law which largely prohibits such clauses.

  • July 18, 2024

    Ex-Seattle Port Police Chief Seeks Up To $20M In Firing Trial

    The Port of Seattle's former police chief told a Washington state jury on Thursday that $14 million to $20 million from his former employer would be a "reasonable range" of damages for robbing him of his law enforcement career as punishment for complaining about unfairness in workplace misconduct investigations.

  • July 18, 2024

    Enviro Groups Deploy Chevron Ruling In Pipeline Case

    Environmental groups suing the federal government over the reissuance of a nationwide Clean Water Act permit that can be used for oil and gas pipelines told a D.C. federal judge Thursday that the recent overturning of the Chevron deference bolsters their effort to get the permit thrown out.

  • July 18, 2024

    6 Firms Steer Latin American Airline Giant's $533M IPO Plans

    Latam Airlines Group SA on Thursday outlined plans for an estimated $533 million U.S. initial public offering, guided by six law firms, marking a return to U.S. markets two years after the South American airline giant exited bankruptcy.

  • July 18, 2024

    6th Circ. Is No Help To CSX Worker Fired For Train Death Post

    The Sixth Circuit ruled Thursday that a former CSX Transporation Inc. engineer waited too long to try to revive his wrongful termination suit stemming from his firing over an online post he made about a fatal train accident.  

  • July 18, 2024

    Auto Software Co. Cerence's Brass Sued Over Licensing Woes

    A shareholder of Cerence Inc. has sued the automobile software company's current and former top brass in Delaware Chancery Court, alleging they made misleading and false statements about the company's expected revenue and the types of licensing deals the company was pushing and entering into.

  • July 18, 2024

    State Of 2024 Energy Dealmaking: Midyear Report

    Energy dealmaking in the first half of 2024 has, in many ways, picked up where 2023 left off, but companies also increasingly have an eye on the U.S. presidential election this fall that could bring drastic change to the landscape. Here are some transactional trends that have stood out to energy attorneys so far this year.

  • July 18, 2024

    DOJ, Treasury Target Mexico-Based Human Smuggling Group

    A Sierra Leone national and his wife are facing criminal charges and sanctions for their roles in an alleged human smuggling organization that brought thousands of migrants into the United States, federal prosecutors have announced.

  • July 18, 2024

    Alstom Wants Las Vegas Train's 'Buy America' Waiver Voided

    Train manufacturer Alstom alleges in a new federal lawsuit that it was unfairly shut out of competing for a lucrative supply contract for Las Vegas' proposed high-speed passenger rail line when the project recently scored a Buy America waiver for foreign-made trainsets from rival manufacturer Siemens.

  • July 18, 2024

    Air Transport Co. Sued In Del. Over Director Removal Rule

    Stockholders of air transport venture Blade Air Mobility Inc. have sued the company in Delaware's Court of Chancery for an order invalidating a Blade director election provision described as allowing "backdoor" board removal of incumbents without legal authority.

  • July 18, 2024

    6th Circ. Looks To Wash Hands Of Waters Of US Appeal

    An exasperated Sixth Circuit panel on Thursday looked for an easy way to dispatch Kentucky's and industry groups' appeal of the dismissal of their challenges to a federal government rule defining the scope of the Clean Water Act.

  • July 18, 2024

    Refiner, Distributor To Pay $1M Fine In EPA Biofuel Case

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said on Thursday that it has slapped an Arizona-based petroleum products company and its affiliate with a more than $1 million civil penalty for violations of the Clean Air Act's conventional and renewable fuel requirements.

  • July 18, 2024

    Woman Can't Get Rectal Cancer Med Mal Suit Reinstated

    A Texas appeals court won't let a woman revive her claims that a doctor with Houston Methodist Willowbrook failed to diagnose her rectal cancer, saying she failed to preserve for appeal the issue of whether the court properly granted a 30-day extension to file an amended expert report.

  • July 18, 2024

    American Airlines Hit With Class Action Over Sales Strategy

    An investor launched a proposed class action against American Airlines over the company's botched sales and distribution strategy, saying that American touted its strategy as driving revenue while hiding the fact that the strategy was "driving customers away" in a Texas federal court on Thursday.

  • July 18, 2024

    Attorney, Businessman Acquitted Of Crash Report Scheme

    A Michigan federal judge on Tuesday cited insufficient evidence and ordered the cancellation of jury convictions against a lawyer and a medical business owner in an alleged scheme to obtain unreleased police crash reports illegally and use the reports to solicit clients.

  • July 18, 2024

    Another Enphase Investor Suit Claims Execs Hid Slow Growth

    Enphase Energy's top brass has been slapped with another shareholder complaint in California federal court, alleging they misrepresented the energy technology company's financial outlook by concealing a decrease in battery shipments and slower manufacturing outputs, which artificially inflated its stock price.

  • July 18, 2024

    Feds Say UAW Shouldn't Be Able To Keep Info From Monitor

    Allowing the United Auto Workers to withhold information from the court-appointed monitor overseeing its cleanup from days of corruption and embezzlement would undermine the purpose of the monitorship, the federal government and the monitor told a Michigan federal judge, asking him to deny the union's bid to shield documents.

  • July 17, 2024

    SF Vax-Mandate Case Will Go To New Jury After Partial Verdict

    A California federal jury considering claims that the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District discriminated against employees who sought religious exemptions from the train agency's COVID-19 mandate rendered a partial verdict Wednesday but hung on a key question, leaving the case unresolved and setting the stage for another trial.

  • July 17, 2024

    'Good Try': EEOC Can't Stop Tesla Talking To Putative Class

    A California federal judge Wednesday rejected the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's bid to bar Tesla from speaking to all putative class members in its lawsuit alleging the carmaker allowed rampant racism to overtake a California factory, rejecting the request while telling its attorney, "Good try, though."

  • July 17, 2024

    MTA Sued For Bus Service Cuts After Congestion Plan Nixed

    New York City's Public Advocate hit the Metropolitan Transportation Authority with a proposed state court class action Wednesday aimed at reversing bus service cuts implemented after Gov. Kathy Hochul abruptly canceled plans for congestion pricing, slashing billions in anticipated revenue for the MTA.

  • July 17, 2024

    FCC To Vote On Smart Car Technology's Use Of 5.9 GHz

    The Federal Communications Commission is ready to vote on rules that would bring advanced vehicle communications technology to the 5.9 GHz band, setting standards for the technology's use in the slice of spectrum and greenlighting the use of in-vehicle and roadside units running on the technology.

  • July 17, 2024

    Timken Fired Plant Manager Over DEI Push, Conn. Suit Says

    A former plant manager says in a Connecticut federal lawsuit that a division of Ohio-based roller bearing supplier Timken violated workplace free speech laws by firing him for citing his own multiracial family while discussing with colleagues his beliefs about the importance of diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives.

  • July 17, 2024

    NY Judge Sends Suits Over Indianapolis FedEx Shooting To SC

    Firearms manufacturer American Tactical Inc has persuaded a New York Judge to send to South Carolina lawsuits that victims of an April 2021 mass shooting at an Indianapolis FedEx facility filed to accuse the company of recklessly advertising a 60-round magazine used in the attack.

  • July 17, 2024

    United, Union Pacific Must Face Genetic Privacy Suits

    United Airlines and Union Pacific Railroad must face proposed class claims that they violated applicants' genetic information privacy rights by requiring them to disclose their family medical history during the hiring process, an Illinois federal judge said in separate orders Tuesday.

  • July 17, 2024

    Drivers' Transmission Complaints Are 'Old News,' GM Says

    Drivers waited too long to file a proposed class action accusing General Motors LLC of selling vehicles with faulty transmissions, the automaker said in a motion Tuesday arguing that many of the claims must be dismissed.

Expert Analysis

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: July Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy considers cases touching on pre- and post-conviction detainment conditions, communications with class representatives, when the American Pipe tolling doctrine stops applying to modified classes, and more.

  • Opinion

    Now More Than Ever, Lawyers Must Exhibit Professionalism

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    As society becomes increasingly fractured and workplace incivility is on the rise, attorneys must champion professionalism and lead by example, demonstrating how lawyers can respectfully disagree without being disagreeable, says Edward Casmere at Norton Rose.

  • What Happens After Hawaii Kids' Historic Climate Deal

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    Implications of the Hawaii Department of Transportation's first-of-its-kind settlement with youth plaintiffs over constitutional climate claims may be limited, but it could incite similar claims, says J. Michael Showalter and Robert Middleton at ArentFox Schiff.

  • 'Outsourcing' Ruling, 5 Years On: A Warning, Not A Watershed

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    A New York federal court’s 2019 ruling in U.S. v. Connolly, holding that the government improperly outsourced an investigation to Deutsche Bank, has not undercut corporate cooperation incentives as feared — but companies should not completely ignore the lessons of the case, say Temidayo Aganga-Williams and Anna Nabutovsky at Selendy Gay.

  • Series

    Serving In The National Guard Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My ongoing military experience as a judge advocate general in the National Guard has shaped me as a person and a lawyer, teaching me the importance of embracing confidence, balance and teamwork in both my Army and civilian roles, says Danielle Aymond at Baker Donelson.

  • Big Business May Come To Rue The Post-Administrative State

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    Many have framed the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decisions overturning Chevron deference and extending the window to challenge regulations as big wins for big business, but sand in the gears of agency rulemaking may be a double-edged sword, creating prolonged uncertainty that impedes businesses’ ability to plan for the future, says Todd Baker at Columbia University.

  • Series

    After Chevron: A Sea Change For Maritime Sector

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    The shipping industry has often looked to the courts for key agency decisions affecting maritime interests, but after the U.S. Supreme Court's Loper Bright ruling, stakeholders may revisit important industry questions and coordinate to bring appropriate challenges and shape rulemaking, say attorneys at Holland & Knight.

  • A Midyear Forecast: Tailwinds Expected For Atty Hourly Rates

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    Hourly rates for partners, associates and support staff continued to rise in the first half of this year, and this growth shows no signs of slowing for the rest of 2024 and into next year, driven in part by the return of mergers and acquisitions and the widespread adoption of artificial intelligence, says Chuck Chandler at Valeo Partners.

  • Opinion

    Cell Tech Patent Holdup Is Stalling Automaker Innovation

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    Courts and Congress should seek to stem anticompetitive harm caused by standard-essential patent holders squeezing automakers with unfairly high royalties for cellular connectivity technology, says Charles Haake at Alliance for Automotive Innovation.

  • California Adds A Novel Twist To State Suits Against Big Oil

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    California’s suit against Exxon Mobil Corp., one of several state suits that seek to hold oil and gas companies accountable for climate-related harms, is unique both in the magnitude of the alleged claims and its use of a consumer protection statute to seek disgorgement of industry profits, says Julia Stein at UCLA School of Law.

  • Opinion

    States Should Loosen Law Firm Ownership Restrictions

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    Despite growing buzz, normalized nonlawyer ownership of law firms is a distant prospect, so the legal community should focus first on liberalizing state restrictions on attorney and firm purchases of practices, which would bolster succession planning and improve access to justice, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • Why Justices Should Rule On FAA's Commerce Exception

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    The U.S. Supreme Court should review the Ninth Circuit's Ortiz v. Randstad decision, to clarify whether involvement in interstate commerce exempts workers from the Federal Arbitration Act, a crucial question given employers' and employees' strong competing interests in arbitration and litigation, says Collin Williams at New Era.

  • Series

    Solving Puzzles Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Tackling daily puzzles — like Wordle, KenKen and Connections — has bolstered my intellectual property litigation practice by helping me to exercise different mental skills, acknowledge minor but important details, and build and reinforce good habits, says Roy Wepner at Kaplan Breyer.

  • Texas Ethics Opinion Flags Hazards Of Unauthorized Practice

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    The Texas Professional Ethics Committee's recently issued proposed opinion finding that in-house counsel providing legal services to the company's clients constitutes the unauthorized practice of law is a valuable clarification given that a UPL violation — a misdemeanor in most states — carries high stakes, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • Electrifying Transportation With Public-Private Partnerships

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    Many clean energy goals remain public policy abstractions that face a challenging road to realization — but public-private partnership models could be a valuable tool to electrify the transportation sector, says Michael Blackwell at Husch Blackwell.

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